everybodiesbeautifulimage
sierramckenzie:

This is hard for me to post but I feel like it is important. I remember hating my face and hating my skin and looking at all the girls around me in middle school and on tv and in ads and feeling like I was a monstrosity in comparison. But I remember the first time I realized women plucked their eyebrows. And wore concealer. And foundation. And powder. I felt like I had been lied to about what women look like. After modeling and realizing when photographers asked for no makeup, they really meant the photo on the right. I started realizing that the photo on the right was what was in skincare ads and posted by people claiming in the caption to be wearing no makeup some of the time. The photo on the right is the bare minimum of what we expect women to look like when they wake up in the morning. I think makeup can be empowering, but I think that acknowledging that it isn’t natural is important. Modeling and wearing makeup so often makes me especially feel like its important to sometimes be uncomfortably honest about how much of the media we consume is altered in some way. Part of me wanted to wait until my skin was better to do this concept but I realized that was totally missing the point. Thanks for taking the time to read.Photography and Graphic Design by Mark Laubenheimer.

sierramckenzie:

This is hard for me to post but I feel like it is important. 

I remember hating my face and hating my skin and looking at all the girls around me in middle school and on tv and in ads and feeling like I was a monstrosity in comparison. But I remember the first time I realized women plucked their eyebrows. And wore concealer. And foundation. And powder. I felt like I had been lied to about what women look like. After modeling and realizing when photographers asked for no makeup, they really meant the photo on the right. I started realizing that the photo on the right was what was in skincare ads and posted by people claiming in the caption to be wearing no makeup some of the time. The photo on the right is the bare minimum of what we expect women to look like when they wake up in the morning. 

I think makeup can be empowering, but I think that acknowledging that it isn’t natural is important. Modeling and wearing makeup so often makes me especially feel like its important to sometimes be uncomfortably honest about how much of the media we consume is altered in some way. 

Part of me wanted to wait until my skin was better to do this concept but I realized that was totally missing the point. 

Thanks for taking the time to read.

Photography and Graphic Design by Mark Laubenheimer.

fabulous-lesbian-queen
Except you can’t show a topless woman on TV - and you can’t defibrillate a woman in a bra. So victims of heart attacks on TV are always male. Did you know that a woman having a heart attack is more likely to have back or jaw pain than chest or left arm pain? I didn’t - because I’ve never seen a woman having a heart attack. I’ve been trained in CPR and Advanced First Aid by the Red Cross over 15 times in my life, the videos and booklets always have a guy and say the same thing about clutching his chest and/or bicep.

And people laugh when I tell them women are still invisible in this world.

distractedbyshinyobjects

re: feministing - for women, heart attacks look different

Things I did not know, but should.

(via elfgrove)

This is a post that might save a life. 

(via str8nochaser)

My mom worked for 25 years as an ER nurse and is convinced that a lot of women die simply because folks only know heart attack symptoms that occur in males. 

(via darkjez)

Society thinks our bodies are so scandalous that it’s better to put our lives at risk than to show us how to stay safe

(via callingoutsexists)

A friend of mine was having a cardiac episode recently, and it began with jaw pain. I had never heard of this before, and god help us, she had to explain to me how cardiac events present in women WHILE HAVING ONE. (I didn’t disbelieve her, I just had idea what the jaw pain meant.)

She is fine now. But if your heart is failing, I suspect you have better things to do than explain to your slow but well-meaning friend the symptoms of a heart attack in women.

(via thatassholewhat)